Facebook Polls Broken?

I’ve been trying to get polls to show up with blank options after the first few required options, and I can’t get the blank “add an option” box to show for me. I can’t get it to show for the Wife, either. This is what the polls look like for me and for her:

I’m not the only one confused by this problem. All over the internet there are questions and responses that go through the frankly obvious method to get a poll to show up in Facebook. It’s not rocket science. None of the answers that I’ve run across discuss this specific problem, or give me a way to get around it.

I’m not the only one that can’t see the additional option boxes. After a member of one of my groups offered up that she could see the additional option box, and sent me a screenshot to prove it:

Several other members piped up that they too could not see the add box. I haven’t yet found a solution to this problem, so I’m creating a blog article simply to illustrate the problem for feedback purposes. I will update this article when/if I find a solution.

Migrating To a New System

I ran across a request for technical support on Facebook today. It seems that there is still a shortage of technical nerds in the outlying provinces of the country. This is understandable to me. Why would you live away from decent healthcare and a wide variety of shopping opportunities? It’s cheaper to live out in the boonies for very good reasons. It pays one to understand what the tradeoffs are for that relaxed country living.

There are no computer outlets in Rotan, or pretty much anywhere USA that can be navigated by referencing the one stoplight in town. This means that if you want your computer upgraded you will have to DIY it or you will have to go somewhere USA that features more than one strip mall. I’m a cheapskate even if I do pay through the nose to be near places that can do stuff for me, so I tend to DIY most things before calling someone to fix the mess I’ve made.

In this particular instance, the person was inquiring about getting their programs and data onto a new system. I’ve done this countless times with my own data and with other people’s data. It’s a pretty straightforward process. First, find everything that came with your old system. This is the justification on my part for keeping every stray bit of garbage that ships with my computer systems and other technical doodads. There is an entire garage full of useless empty boxes that can attest to this tendency of mine.

Hopefully you’ve tossed all the installation media that came with the original system into the empty shipping box, along with every other program you installed over the years that you’ve used that system.

Without the original installation media, it will be hard to make the programs work if you transfer to a new hard drive or a new windows installation. My suggestion would be to track down the programs you know you will need to re-install, first. Then make a decent backup. There are several pay systems out there that will back up you data for you, but you can also DIY that yourself with a series of DVD’s, or just get a separate backup drive and make a backup on that drive (this is something everyone should be periodically doing, and virtually no one does. Until it is too late) make a backup before proceeding further.

Crack the case open on both systems and see if the drive cables are the same type. If they are, then try to move the old drive to the new system. There may be some fiddly BIOS settings you will need to do in order to boot to the other drive, so you will probably have to get into the BIOS at startup to make that work. There should be a visible prompt on the screen advising you of how to get into the BIOS. Nearly every computer does this.

If the old drive boots in the new system, you are golden. No worries. You can reformat the new hard drive that came with the system and use it for data storage. Like backing up, putting your personal data on a separate drive from the operating system is just good computer hygiene. If the OS craps out on a separate drive (the most frequent problem) you can just reformat that drive and reinstall the OS without disturbing your personal data. Be careful to reformat the right drive! Can’t tell you the number of times that error has been made. Even I have done it.

If the old drive doesn’t boot in the new system, or if it is a different type of hard drive, then you are going to have to re-install the programs yourself or pay someone to do it for you. At least you will have the media to install from because you found the media before starting this process. Then you do the opposite of what I described above, and remove the old OS folders from your data drive, placing your data where you can find it again somewhere else on that drive.

The process is not easy. I will not say that four letter word willingly on any subject. However, it is doable by anyone with the patience it takes to carefully go through the steps I’ve outlined above. I hate dealing with hardware myself. I’m always convinced I’ve just made another expensive paperweight every time I crack open a case. The number of times that has been true has been less than double digits, and I’ve cracked open somewhere near a hundred different computer cases over the years.

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Brain Fog 2

I went to see my Otolaryngologist (an Ear, Nose & Throat doctor or ENT) yesterday. I had an emergency work-in appointment for the afternoon. The Wife drove herself to her cardio rehabilitation appointment in the morning, the second time she has driven herself since she had open-heart surgery in July. I’ve been driving her three times a week to that appointment over the months since, and the strain of being there for her over the course of those months has finally taken a toll on me.

Last Wednesday I started experiencing rotational vertigo. It persisted through the day, no matter how hard I tried to tamp it down. I finally gave up and took Xanax to quell it, but then I started feeling nauseous and so had to add a Phenergan to the mix to keep myself from hugging the commode for a few hours while the room continued to spin. Needless to say, I slept the sleep of the dead for about twelve hours.

When I woke up the next morning I could tell that my hearing had altered. I couldn’t say how, but I knew it was different. I was having a hard time focusing too. Muddy thoughts, muddy feelings, muddy existence. I struggled through the day, not feeling myself at all. The Wife got clearance from her heart surgeon so that she could drive herself to her appointment on Friday, just in case; and indeed I was hardly capable of driving on Friday when I woke up. I did manage to get to McDonald’s and back for breakfast, but the habit of ordering coffee with my morning cheeseless McMuffin that I had developed over the course of the few months I had spent chauffeuring the Wife to her rehab appointments finally bit back, and the caffeine from the coffee started up another round of vertigo that lasted into Saturday.

Brain fog on Saturday. Brain fog on Sunday. Barely able to discern what it was I was thinking at any given moment. On the upside, my re-emerged symptoms gave me time to play World of Warcraft for the first time in over a month; but on the downside none of the many other things that I had been putting off for months seemed possible. I was finally able to do some technical work late Sunday night, but that just exposed me to one of my known allergic reactions (dust) which then triggered symptoms again.

At my Monday ENT appointment the audiologist determined that I had lost another 10% of hearing from my left ear. Had it been the right ear, I would have let them give me an intratympanic injection of steroids to try to preserve the hearing. My right ear is my only remaining connection to the normal hearing world. The left ear losing another 10% puts it just under half as effective as a normal ear. Not enough to worry about, from my perspective. I went home with a prescription for oral steroids, which I don’t intend to take.

There is a new weather front rolling into Austin as I type this. I can feel my thoughts slowly draining away as the pressure changes and my tinnitus worsens. It’s time to leash the dog and go for a walk before the storm hits. Maybe I’ll watch a familiar movie or play some more Warcraft tonight. It will be something to look forward to at least. There doesn’t appear to be a lot of writing or thinking for me in the near future.

Biden vs. Reagan

For the past thirty years, every single time we’ve had a new President, that first year of the new president, the president’s party lost both the Virginia governor and the New Jersey governor. Every single time.

Except this time Democrats didn’t lose New Jersey. In a rational world this would not be a cause for Democratic panic. Quite the contrary.

Democrats have beat the odds. They’ve done better than everybody’s done going back to the great communicator, Ronald Reagan, who’s the last president who pulled this off.

The last time a president managed to only lose one of those governorships in the first year he was in office, it was the great communicator himself Ronald Reagan.

Biden has done something that no other President has been able to do since Reagan. You would think this would be cause for celebration in the Democratic party.

Rachel Maddow – November 3, 2021
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In the meantime, this is what has happened to the party of Reagan:

dallasnews.com

Scores of QAnon believers gathered Tuesday afternoon in downtown Dallas in the hopes that John F. Kennedy Jr. would appear, heralding the reinstatement of Donald Trump as president.

dallasnews.com

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

I was briefly infatuated with Richard Powers listening to this interview:

spotify.com – Ezra Klein – This Conversation With Richard Powers Is a Gift

I was so infatuated that I started looking for the transcript of the show and noting the parts of the interview that struck me as I was out on a walk listening to it. I mistakenly published my notes at some point during the walk, and then just left them published because it was too much work to figure out how to unpublish it from the mobile interface. It’s been sitting at the top of the blog for days now, still only partially finished. My apologies.

Capitalism

Commodity mediated, individualist, market driven human exceptionalism…

…I had this sense that to become a better person and to get ahead and to really make more of myself, I had to be as productive as possible. And that meant waking up every morning and getting 1,000 words that I was proud of. And it’s interesting that I would even settle on a quantitative target. That’s very typical for that kind of mindset that I’m talking about — 1,000 words and then you’re free, and then you can do what you want with the day.

Richard Powers

Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.

Henry David Thoreau, Walden
Finding the Mother Tree by Suzanne Simard

I had heard of Suzanne Simard long before this episode of Ezra’s show. Way back when I first started listening to podcasts. During my binging of the back catalog of Radiolab, I ran across this episode:

Radiolab -From Tree to Shining Tree – July 30, 2016

To summarize the part of her work that is covered in that episode, trees feed each other through the network of fungi that fill the ground around them. The forest is more than just the trees. The forest exists for its own purpose. A purpose that has absolutely nothing to do with us.

If we see all of evolution as somehow leading up to us, all of human, cultural evolution leading up to neoliberalism and here we are just busily trying to accumulate and make meaning for ourselves, death becomes the enemy. When we enter into or recover this sense of kinship that was absolutely fundamental to so many indigenous cultures everywhere around the world at many, many different points in history, that there is no radical break between us and our kin, that even consciousness is shared, to some degree and to a large degree, with a lot of other creatures, then death stops seeming like the enemy and it starts seeming like one of the most ingenious kinds of design for keeping evolution circulating and keeping the experiment running and recombining.

And to go from terror into being and into that sense that the experiment is sacred, not this one outcome of the experiment, is to immediately transform the way that you think even about very fundamental social and economic and cultural things. If the experiment is sacred, how can we possibly justify our food systems, for instance? It’s only the belief that we share no significant kinds of meditation or emotional life with cows that allow us to run the kind of food system that we run.

Richard Powers

I am not nearly as impressed with Neil Postman as both Ezra and Richard Powers are. When I got to that section of the interview, my infatuation with Powers waned significantly. I have some pointed thoughts about Neil Postman, some of which may eventually appear here after I finish working through the two books of his that I’m on again, off again, listening to. In the meantime, here’s a link to the other true prophet that Ezra mentions:

The Essential McLuhan by Marshall McLuhan

Richard Powers’ books:

Litany Against Fear

I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past, I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

Dune

If I was to risk my life to see a movie, this is possibly the only movie that I would cross that line for:

DUNE – FINAL TRAILER – Oct 7, 2021

Check out the ‘thopters, man. Finally someone gives me real ‘thopters. That alone will get me to go watch the movie, even in a time of plague.

Dune – Official Main Trailer – Jul 22, 2021

I just hope the movie has a story. A story that feels something like the story in the book. I’m not looking for the book as a movie, I’m looking to feel the same way about the story in the movie as I do about the story in the book. Fingers crossed.


The first movie of Denis Villeneuve’s Dune ends immediately following Jamis’ Tahaddi challenge. Given the place in the first book where the movie ends, I would say that there are at least two more movies of material left to put on the screen. That is, if we are talking about the series of movies ending where the first book ends. If we go on to Dune Messiah and Children of Dune, then we have at least a nine-film epic.

I liked his handling of the story as far as it went. He departed from the text several times, and yet the story remains intact underneath the changes. The director deftly weaves a tale that was made for the screen out of the text that Frank Herbert wrote, and he does it better than all the others who have attempted to tell the story before.

Jodorowsky’s Dune (2014)

Documents the first time someone tried to bring the book to the big screen. While the attempt was fatally flawed from the beginning, the collaborations that started with that endeavor went on to generate a dozen other works that would be sorely missed today had the attempt not been made. I’m glad the movie was never finished. There is no way the completed project could equal the grandeur of the vision that is presented in the pitches for the movie.

Dune (1984)

Unfortunately for us, David Lynch did complete his attempt to put Dune on the big screen. Luckily for us, David Lynch went on to make better movies. Don’t get me wrong, there are facets of the 1984 Dune that are grandiose almost beyond imagining unless you have seen the movie yourself. The guild steersman in the first act; in fact, all of the first third of the movie was excellent. All of the casting for the Harkonnen’s including Sting as Feyd-Rautha was excellent. Unfortunately the production couldn’t create ornithopters that looked like ornithopters. They also abandoned the Prana-Bindu training/fighting in favor of creating a gadget that they called a weirding module to make the fighters unbeatable.

The production suffered from many problems during the course of the movies’ creation and this shows in the finished product. There were long exposition sequences throughout the film, a shortcut to storytelling on film that is never a good idea. The Wife walked out of the movie back in 1984, midway through one of the sequences that featured a bloody battle scene while the voiceover track intones “…and Paul and Chani were in love.” The horror of it was too much to bear. She spent the remaining hour of the movie playing video games in the arcade attached to the theater.

I have watched the movie several times over the years. It never got better for me, which is its own condemnation of the effort in my eyes. When you know a story before seeing the movie made from it, the anxiety of what you are about to see enacted on something you know and love overshadows everything. This has proven to be true for me for every movie that I have watched after reading the book. The first viewing is almost painful to endure. If the movie is good though, the later viewings get better and more enjoyable because you already know how the movie treats the thing you are nostalgic for.

1984 Dune treated a novel that I had read more times than I had read anything else very poorly. It strayed from the meaning and intent of the story almost from the moment the characters touch down on Arrakis. I had read the first four novels seven times through before seeing the movie in 1984 and most books never get a second reading by me. Dune spoke to me in ways that other books did not. Frank Herbert understood realpolitik, and he wove his vaguely recognizable societal groups into a believable future framework that gives the reader insight on the world of power politics, and what can happen when an oppressed population is given a savior that they recognize instinctively. Almost none of this was present in the 1984 version of Dune.

Dune (2000) Miniseries

This version was superior to Lynch’s version. It was more like the story it was trying to tell than 1984 Dune. True, they still didn’t get the ornithopters right, and they didn’t have Sting as Feyd-Rautha, but they made do with what they had and at least tried to tell the story that Frank Herbert wrote. I’ve never managed to catch this series since it first aired, so I have little recollection of it now. I just remember being glad to see the story treated more like I expected it to be treated, instead of being buried behind special effects sequences that could never replace real storytelling. They even went on to make:

Children of Dune (2003) Miniseries

An adaptation of the second two books of the series. I remember even less of this series than I do the first SyFy series, although I remember watching both. This one didn’t impress me with it’s ability to bring the story to the screen. In the end the small screen can’t compare to the big screen and these stories deserve to be on a big screen.

All of this is my way of saying that I look forward to seeing Jason Momoa returning in movie number four as the Goula Hayt. I’ll be along for the ride for at least that long. Here’s hoping that Denis Villeneuve gets the green light to continue with the second movies’ creation.

Someone Else Will Do It

The doorbell rings. Again. I know who it is. There is a group home across the street. One of the new guests at the home is a tiny little woman with some kind of learning disability. Before I knew she had a learning disability I had threatened her off my property with a blunt object after she rang the doorbell seven different times in one day. Now that I know she can’t help herself, I have resigned myself to the hell of living next to a profit-making group home that doesn’t understand its obligations to it’s paying guests.

I try ignoring the doorbell, even though it grates on my nerves. The Wife says “come smell the bread. It’ll make you happy.” She’s baking bread again. It’s a good sign. We’ve just gotten back from a walk in Bartholomew park, a walk where I spent quality time and energy moving shopping carts up out of the park and onto the road shoulder where the local HEB would be able see it’s errant carts and come get them. I wasn’t able to do more than move them up to the street because I can’t leave the Wife unsupervised for long in her current drugged post-surgery state. She was looking for me as it was and was almost in tears when I got back to her.

That is me not leaving to others what I can do myself. Internalizing the work that needs doing and getting it done because someone needs to do it. This is me taking the overworked staff of the nearby HEB into account, people whose jobs I once did as well, and doing my part to help them out. One of the kids biking through the park was mystified by my behavior. “Are you working?” he asked me.

“No,” I said. “I’m doing what somebody else should have done a month ago.” The grass had grown up around some of these carts. I knew they had been there for weeks at least. Like most people these days, this child had no idea of the meaning of civic service, of maintaining public spaces for the benefit of all. Most people understand that externalized costs; in this case, leaving the carts for someone else to pick up and move, will profit them with more time and energy. They don’t understand that the costs come out of everyone’s enjoyment in using the public space, out of our pockets in increased prices at the stores that have to replace the lost carts.

There were more carts in the park than I could move, and the Wife cajoled me back into the car rather than let me wear myself out doing the work that other’s wouldn’t do. Got me back in the car to drive back home, only for us to be confronted with even more work being left undone. Work that others were actually being paid to do. Paid to do, and shirking in their paid duties. The doorbell rings twice more.

Knowing my state of mind and fearing a further tirade on my part, the Wife mercifully answered the door for me and shoed the poor woman off with encouragement to do whatever it was she felt she needed to tell us about before doing. She’s bothered neighbors up and down the street now by ringing their doorbells. She’s pestered the school across the street to near distraction with her insistence she needed to go visit the children in the school.

However, she isn’t the problem. The group home is the problem. There has been another guest over here recently, someone has been stealing water out of our front hose bib. I’ve caught him in the act more than once. It’s not that I mind the occasional bottle filling, what I do mind is these intruders leaving the valve open and letting water run out all over the yard for days, costing me hundreds of dollars in wasted water because I don’t know someone else left the tap on.

The more recent visitor has complained that the water isn’t available to the residents of the group home. I don’t know how true that is, but it would explain the visits to fill bottles before setting out on a daily meander. A daily meander that probably shouldn’t be carried on unsupervised if the individual in question is just going to wander onto private property and take things.

The management of the group home is being paid by the caretakers (family or state, whoever they are) of the residents to keep staff in residence to assist these people with their daily needs. They are being paid and then they let their charges roam freely about the neighborhood. Let them annoy neighbors with their demands which remain unsatisfied by the people who are being paid to take care of them. Externalize costs, internalize profits.

What do they care? They’re making money. So what if the lives of the neighbors are impacted by their dereliction of duty?

The original owner of the house, a man I knew, had his own problems that impacted the neighborhood. He ran an automotive shop out of his garage, and this aggravated a lot of neighbors. The difference here is, if one of us wanted to talk to him, we knew where he lived and could take up our complaints with him or have the city intercede on our behalf.

After he lost/sold the house it has passed through several hands, none of them good hands. We’ve joked over the years about the quality of the neighbors gradually becoming more hellish. First it was a migrant workers home, packed full of dozens of people. Then it was a gang den, a drug dealer’s delivery center, and now it is the cannibal’s house. They should be exhuming body parts out of the backyard any day now unless the final form of derelict property owner, a flame-enshrouded pitchfork wielder, turns the property into a gateway to Hell itself and swallows it and the neighborhood whole. How I miss the days when it was just broken down cars sitting in the driveway across the street.

Now there is the weekly visit from police/EMS/HHS, lights flashing, sirens blaring at all hours of the day and night. All because the management of the group home, Grace & Mercy Supervised Living, doesn’t have a presence in the neighborhood that can be held to account for their dereliction. The owners of the venture fled with the the proceeds, the company now in arrears. Just another Trump, just another Kushner, just another slumlord profiting off the misery of others, leaving the real work for other people to do.

No wonder that child in the park couldn’t understand what I was doing. None of the people who are held up as behavioral examples for him to model would ever stoop to doing real work in public, especially if they weren’t being paid to do it.

Ear Fullness

Ear fullness is a common complaint among Meniere’s sufferers. It is one of the key indicators of Meniere’s along with a specific kind of hearing loss and vertigo attacks. What it feels like is hard to describe.

If you have ever flown in a plane or gone up in a tall building, climbed a mountain or gone down to the seashore from a high elevation, you have likely had a feeling of pressure inside your head. A pressure that is directly behind the ear canal. Frequent travelers know the feeling and what to do about it. Pulling on an earlobe, working the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by shifting the jaw back and forth until the ear pops, chewing gum, etc. There are many ways to get the canals behind your ear, the eustachian tubes, to clear so that the pressure in the inner ear becomes equal to the pressure on the outside of your ear and the discomfort goes away.

Ear fullness is like that, but not like that. Imagine that kind of discomfort elevated to a level of pain that is very hard to ignore, and then imagine that you can’t get the pain that feels like it is right behind your eardrum to go away no matter how hard you chew gum, work your jaw, etc. This pain goes on for days, sometimes for weeks.

You can’t get the pain to go away, the pressure to equalize, because the pain doesn’t come from a pressure imbalance behind the eardrum. It comes from the fluid-filled chambers of the inner ear itself, the cochlea, and the fluid imbalance that produces all the other symptoms of Meniere’s disease.

The first time the ear fullness presented itself, I sat in the shower for an hour or more trying to make what I thought was a plugged eustachian tube clear itself. Instead I induced a multi-day vertigo spell by rupturing one of the vessels in the cochlea of my left ear. As you can probably imagine, I don’t recommend that form of treatment.

The next time ear fullness presented itself a few years later, I had to resist the temptation to gouge the ear out with a sharp implement. I understandably didn’t want to look like Vincent Van Gogh, who might very well have suffered from a similar affliction. I had access to a sauna at the time and I spent far too many hours sitting in it just hoping that the pain would ease off. Ease off just a little.

The pressure never did ease off. The sauna did do wonders for clearing my sinuses, though.

There is no known way to reduce this pressure in the ear. It is possible that early treatment with intratympanic injections of steroids can reduce the pressure and prevent hearing loss in a newly affected ear, but it is not a universally successful treatment, and it carries potential hazards that make it an undesirable treatment for routine incidents of pain. Hazards like permanent deafness and severe instances of vertigo.

Because I thought that what I was suffering from was allergies, I experimented with various allergy drugs trying to find the right balance of treatment that would produce the best effect with the least side effects. What I settled on was Pseudoephedrine and Guaifenesin which I took pretty routinely every six hours for months at a time. I took those two drugs for about twenty years or so every Spring and every Fall.

With a nod to the concerns of my cardiologist I have forgone continuing the use of Pseudoephedrine unless I simply can’t breath through my sinuses at night. However, I still take Guaifenesin when the ear fullness rears it’s ugly head. I don’t know if the soothing of the pain is placebo, or if the Guaifenesin is somehow helping the fluid in my ear to balance out. I don’t know, and I don’t care. I feel better after taking it and that is good enough for me in the end.

Brainworm

The last song you heard stays in your head just like the taste of the last cigarette you smoked. When it won’t go away, we call that a brainworm. The stale riff stays in your head till you replace it with a new riff. That one gets stale if you don’t listen to another song. Music is a habit forming drug.

One man’s brain worm is another man’s favorite song. The difference lies in the answer to the question “do I want to hear that song again?” If the answer is no, then what you’ve got is a brainworm.

spotifyNPR: Shortwave – Why music sticks in our brains – October 7, 2021

They call it an earworm in one of the ads for the episode. They don’t, however, tell you about how earworms persist or how to get rid of them. Any song that doesn’t stick in your head can serve as a brainworm killer. The Wife uses Mandy by Barry Manilow. I hate Barry Manilow, but I have developed a grudging respect for the song. Especially if you sing it with over-dramatic zeal:

…make it broader, with tons of shoulder. Remember, you’re a drag queen!

Victor/Victoria
Victor Victoria (1982)

Is Mandy a man or a woman? Does it matter? No it doesn’t. What matters is that you consciously force your mind to mingle the worm with the new lyrics and melody, in much the same way that you get rid of the hiccups by breathing and drinking water in a deliberate pattern, training the ticking muscles to adapt to the new pattern. You will it gone with a heavy bludgeon of Barry if that is what works.

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Libertarian Vaccination Lunacy

I was rooting through my email today looking for spam. I don’t mean the ads for prescription drugs that you can’t buy legally; no I mean the daily if not hourly emailers that you have unwittingly asked to send you messages, and then they drown you in more information than you could possibly synthesize.

I found quite a few of those. Then, at the bottom of the barrel, I see a note from the Travis County Libertarians letting me know that they’ve moved their newsletter from the old Yahoo!Groups site to the new Google Groups site. Well bless their little hearts!

Being bored, in the middle of a task that I had put off for months if not years, I decided to see what was on the latest issue of the newsletter. Ah, the usual. Chat and chews are scheduled. I’ll be skipping those. I’d skip them anyway but I’ll definitely be skipping being face to face with the unvaccinated. The kind of people who think this ad represents any kind of deep thinking:

twitter.com

We can’t force people to get vaccinated? Tell that to the TB-tine scar on my arm. Not only can we force people to get vaccinated, we have before and we should be doing it again. That is how you get to herd immunity successfully, for fuck’s sake. That’s how we wiped out small pox and polio. We could have wiped out the measles, but antivaxxers like the ones that the Libertarian Party is appealing to in that ad have set us all back decades on that goal.

I mean, if they want to thumb their noses at Biden’s policies, Abbott has them beat:

Gov. Greg Abbott on Monday issued an executive order prohibiting any entity in Texas from mandating COVID-19 vaccinations for employees or consumers, an expansion of a prior order limited to government entities.

Abbott also asked lawmakers to tackle the issue during the current special legislative session, ensuring that “no entity in Texas can compel receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine.”

statesman.com

Why does Abbott have them beat? Because he has the office of the Governor, that’s why. Something they will never have because they will never be serious about winning races instead of grandstanding during the race. The libertarians that were serious about winning races became the Tea Party back in 2008, and they have made the Republican party the lunatic fringe that we all know and love today. They are all Trumpists, almost to a man now. The kind of people who will have to be lead to the end of the pandemic at the point of a gun, apparently.

Greg Abbott doesn’t have the power to stop Biden’s orders. Only the Republican delinquents in the Senate stand between effective governance and the anarchy that libertarians crave, and they hope like hell that the citizenry is dumb enough to keep voting Republican so that the government will finally crumble. Here’s hoping they are denied their wish, or if not, that they turn out happier with the results than the anarchists were who backed Stalin’s bid for power in Russia. They didn’t seem too pleased with being sent to the gulag for all their troubles.